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What is an Eosinophil and How Does it Contribute to the Immune System?

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play a crucial role in the body’s immune response, particularly in combating parasitic infections and in the regulation of allergic reactions. These cells are part of the body’s broader immune system, which protects against infections, mediates healing processes, and maintains homeostasis.

Eosinophils are granulocytes, characterized by the presence of large cytoplasmic granules that are readily stained by eosin, a red dye, which is how they derive their name. These cells are produced in the bone marrow and differentiate from the same precursor cells as neutrophils and basophils, under the influence of specific growth factors like interleukin-5 (IL-5), GM-CSF, and IL-3 (Rothenberg & Hogan, 2006). The lifespan of eosinophils in the bloodstream is typically short, ranging from 8 to 12 hours, after which they migrate to tissues, where they can survive for an additional 8 to 12 days under normal conditions.

Eosinophils perform several functions within the immune system, primarily related to host defense against parasitic infections and the modulation of inflammatory responses.

Eosinophils are especially effective against multicellular parasites, such as helminths. These cells recognize and attach to the surface of parasites through antibody-dependent mechanisms, primarily involving IgE antibodies. Once bound, eosinophils release cytotoxic granule proteins such as major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). These proteins have the capacity to damage or kill parasites directly (Gleich & Adolphson, 1986).

Beyond their anti-parasitic activities, eosinophils influence various aspects of inflammation. They participate in the modulation of immune responses through the release of a variety of cytokines and chemokines. Eosinophils produce cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13, which are critical in promoting Th2 cell responses, a subtype of T helper cells that play a key role in the immune response to allergens and helminths. Moreover, eosinophils can influence the function of other immune cells, including mast cells, basophils, and T cells, thereby contributing to the development and resolution of inflammatory responses.

While eosinophils are beneficial in fighting infections and in immune regulation, their activation must be tightly controlled. Elevated levels of eosinophils, a condition known as eosinophilia, can contribute to a variety of diseases, primarily allergic diseases such as asthma and eosinophilic esophagitis. In these conditions, eosinophils contribute to tissue damage and inflammation by the excessive release of their granule proteins, leading to tissue remodeling and fibrosis.

In allergic asthma, eosinophils are recruited to the airways by IL-5 and eotaxin, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells. These eosinophils contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus production, and the characteristic inflammation of the airways (Foster et al., 1996).

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is another example of an eosinophil-associated disease, where eosinophils infiltrate the esophagus, leading to inflammation, tissue damage, and dysphagia. This condition is often associated with food allergies and can be managed by dietary modifications and corticosteroids to reduce eosinophil levels (Rothenberg, 2009).

Understanding the role of eosinophils in health and disease has led to the development of targeted therapies, particularly for conditions like severe asthma. Monoclonal antibodies such as mepolizumab, which targets IL-5, have been developed to reduce eosinophilic inflammation and improve symptoms in patients with eosinophilic disorders (Haldar et al., 2009).

Eosinophils are integral components of the immune system, contributing to the defense against parasitic infections and the regulation of inflammatory processes. While essential for health, their dysregulation can lead to disease. Ongoing research into eosinophil biology not only helps us understand their complex roles in immunity but also aids in the development of eosinophil-targeted therapies for allergic and inflammatory diseases.

References

Rothenberg, M. E., & Hogan, S. P. (2006). The eosinophil. Annual Review of Immunology, 24, 147-174.

Gleich, G. J., & Adolphson, C. R. (1986). The eosinophilic leukocyte: Structure and function. Advances in Immunology, 39, 177-253.

Foster, P. S., Hogan, S. P., Ramsay, A. J., Matthaei, K. I., & Young, I. G. (1996). Interleukin 5 deficiency abolishes eosinophilia, airways hyperreactivity, and lung damage in a mouse asthma model. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 183(1), 195-201.

Haldar, P., Brightling, C. E., Hargadon, B., et al. (2009). Mepolizumab and exacerbations of refractory eosinophilic asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 360, 973-984.

Rothenberg, M. E. (2009). Eosinophilia. New England Journal of Medicine, 360(23), 2396-2398.

If you have any questions about the Berkeley Formula Diindolylmethane (DIM) Supplement & Immune System Booster, please feel free to contact our customer service department at 877-777-0719 (9AM-5PM M-F PST) and our representatives will be happy to answer any questions that you may have. We will be glad to share with you why the Berkeley Formula is the DIM supplement of choice by nutritional scientists, medical professionals and biomedical investigators worldwide.

Romanesco Broccoli with a Natural Fractal Pattern

Romanesco Broccoli

What is an Eosinophil and How Does it Contribute to the Immune System?

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play a crucial role in the body’s immune response, particularly in combating parasitic infections and in the regulation of allergic reactions. These cells are part of the body’s broader immune system, which protects against infections, mediates healing processes, and maintains homeostasis.

Eosinophils are granulocytes, characterized by the presence of large cytoplasmic granules that are readily stained by eosin, a red dye, which is how they derive their name. These cells are produced in the bone marrow and differentiate from the same precursor cells as neutrophils and basophils, under the influence of specific growth factors like interleukin-5 (IL-5), GM-CSF, and IL-3 (Rothenberg & Hogan, 2006). The lifespan of eosinophils in the bloodstream is typically short, ranging from 8 to 12 hours, after which they migrate to tissues, where they can survive for an additional 8 to 12 days under normal conditions.

Eosinophils perform several functions within the immune system, primarily related to host defense against parasitic infections and the modulation of inflammatory responses.

Eosinophils are especially effective against multicellular parasites, such as helminths. These cells recognize and attach to the surface of parasites through antibody-dependent mechanisms, primarily involving IgE antibodies. Once bound, eosinophils release cytotoxic granule proteins such as major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). These proteins have the capacity to damage or kill parasites directly (Gleich & Adolphson, 1986).

Beyond their anti-parasitic activities, eosinophils influence various aspects of inflammation. They participate in the modulation of immune responses through the release of a variety of cytokines and chemokines. Eosinophils produce cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13, which are critical in promoting Th2 cell responses, a subtype of T helper cells that play a key role in the immune response to allergens and helminths. Moreover, eosinophils can influence the function of other immune cells, including mast cells, basophils, and T cells, thereby contributing to the development and resolution of inflammatory responses.

While eosinophils are beneficial in fighting infections and in immune regulation, their activation must be tightly controlled. Elevated levels of eosinophils, a condition known as eosinophilia, can contribute to a variety of diseases, primarily allergic diseases such as asthma and eosinophilic esophagitis. In these conditions, eosinophils contribute to tissue damage and inflammation by the excessive release of their granule proteins, leading to tissue remodeling and fibrosis.

In allergic asthma, eosinophils are recruited to the airways by IL-5 and eotaxin, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells. These eosinophils contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus production, and the characteristic inflammation of the airways (Foster et al., 1996).

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is another example of an eosinophil-associated disease, where eosinophils infiltrate the esophagus, leading to inflammation, tissue damage, and dysphagia. This condition is often associated with food allergies and can be managed by dietary modifications and corticosteroids to reduce eosinophil levels (Rothenberg, 2009).

Understanding the role of eosinophils in health and disease has led to the development of targeted therapies, particularly for conditions like severe asthma. Monoclonal antibodies such as mepolizumab, which targets IL-5, have been developed to reduce eosinophilic inflammation and improve symptoms in patients with eosinophilic disorders (Haldar et al., 2009).

Eosinophils are integral components of the immune system, contributing to the defense against parasitic infections and the regulation of inflammatory processes. While essential for health, their dysregulation can lead to disease. Ongoing research into eosinophil biology not only helps us understand their complex roles in immunity but also aids in the development of eosinophil-targeted therapies for allergic and inflammatory diseases.

References

Rothenberg, M. E., & Hogan, S. P. (2006). The eosinophil. Annual Review of Immunology, 24, 147-174.

Gleich, G. J., & Adolphson, C. R. (1986). The eosinophilic leukocyte: Structure and function. Advances in Immunology, 39, 177-253.

Foster, P. S., Hogan, S. P., Ramsay, A. J., Matthaei, K. I., & Young, I. G. (1996). Interleukin 5 deficiency abolishes eosinophilia, airways hyperreactivity, and lung damage in a mouse asthma model. Journal of Experimental Medicine, 183(1), 195-201.

Haldar, P., Brightling, C. E., Hargadon, B., et al. (2009). Mepolizumab and exacerbations of refractory eosinophilic asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 360, 973-984.

Rothenberg, M. E. (2009). Eosinophilia. New England Journal of Medicine, 360(23), 2396-2398.

If you have any questions about the Berkeley Formula Diindolylmethane (DIM) Supplement & Immune System Booster, please feel free to contact our customer service department at 877-777-0719 (9AM-5PM M-F PST) and our representatives will be happy to answer any questions that you may have. We will be glad to share with you why the Berkeley Formula is the DIM supplement of choice by nutritional scientists, medical professionals and biomedical investigators worldwide.

Romanesco Broccoli with a Natural Fractal Pattern

Romanesco Broccoli
Berkeley Immune Support Formula Immune Booster Supplement
Alex Amini, M.D. Quote

Alex Amini, M.D.
Infectious Disease Specialist
Kaiser Permanente

Broccoli
Broccoli:
Diindolylmethane
Sulforaphane
Selenium
Spinach
Spinach:
Lutein
Zeaxanthin
Citrus Fruits
Citrus Fruits:
Citrus Bioflavonoids
Tomato
Tomato:
Lycopene
Broccoli
Broccoli:
Diindolylmethane
Sulforaphane
Selenium
  • Powerful Nutritional Immune Booster

    Bioavailable Nutrient Delivery System

  • Diindolylmethane (DIM):

    Immune, Breast, Prostate & Colon Heath

  • Sulforaphane:

    Cellular Detoxification

  • Selenium:

    Immune, Breast, Prostate & Vision Health

  • Lycopene:

    Cardiovascular, Breast & Prostate Health

  • Lutein:

    Immune, Vision, Prostate & Skin Health

  • Zeaxanthin:

    Vision Health

  • Vitamin D3:

    Immune Support & Bone Health

  • Citrus Bioflavonoids:

    Immune & Cardiovascular Health

  • Zinc:

    Immune, Breast, Prostate & Vision Health

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Berkeley Immune Support Formula Capsule

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